Posts tagged ‘things need to change’

June 25, 2007

I changed my ethnic background on Myspace

I decided to tweak my Myspace profile under the ethnicity category.  Although I am more Asian than anything else, I just didn’t feel totally honest having that as my official race on my profile.  I feel like I am excluding other parts of my close family who are also a big part of who I am by just putting down one race. However, I do not want to put down “Other” as my ethnic background, either.  I put down EurAsian, Hapa, Caucinasian (I’m Irish/British, 1/8 American Indian, and 1/2 Korean, among other categories) and Amerasian (which is arguable since there are different definitions for the term “Amerasian”).

Some people think it might be ridiculous to have these terms for mixed races. They might think it’s going too far or getting too specific. But really, would those people feel comfortable denying one of their parents or grandparents?  Those people also probably don’t realize or forget that Hispanic is an ethnicity that is a mix of other ethnicities (Amerindian, Spanish, sometimes African/Black descent).

Taken from http://www.projectrace.com/aboutprojectrace:

About Project RACE

Biracial and multiracial people do not have a box to check on forms. Being forced to choose only one race forces us to deny one of our parents. It also requires us to do something illegal, since we are defining ourselves as something we are not.

Multiracial people should have the option of recognizing all of their heritage. “Multiracial” is important so that children have an identity, a correct terminology for who they are. “Other” means different, a label that no person should bear. Also, without proper racial and ethnic classifications, multiracial people are “invisible” in the health care system.

Mission Statement

Project RACE advocates for multiracial children and adults through education, community awareness and legislation. Our main goal is for a multiracial classification on all school, employment, state, federal, local, census and medical forms requiring racial data.

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June 14, 2007

10-year sentence for teen sex thrown out

Many of you have probably seen this article on Yahoo! News from a few days ago. I just think it’s sad this kid’s life is screwed up because some judge wanted to prove a point. He’s lost some of his most crucial years to this crap. I do believe that sex crimes are horrible. But when a 15 and 17 year old have consensual sexual relations, I do not believe it’s anywhere near the same thing as say… someone being sexually assaulted and forced to have sex.  And while a 17 year old maybe shouldn’t be getting oral sex from a 15 year old (of course, that’s debatable), it certainly shouldn’t have landed him any jail time, especially not ten years. They better let him out of jail NOW.

From http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070611/ap_on_re_us/teen_sex_case:

By SHANNON McCAFFREY, Associated Press Writer Mon Jun 11, 7:51 PM ET

ATLANTA – A former high school football star who became a national symbol for the extremes of getting tough on sex offenders was ordered released from prison Monday by a judge who called his mandatory 10-year sentence for consensual teen sex “a grave miscarriage of justice.”

But the joy felt by Genarlow Wilson’s family rapidly turned to disappointment as Georgia’s attorney general announced he would appeal, a move that will keep the honor student behind bars for now.

Wilson’s sentence was widely criticized as being too severe, even by members of the jury that convicted him and the author of the 1995 law that put him behind bars.

His case became a cause celebre that grew from local blogs and TV stations to national news shows and editorial pages. Some supporters, including former President Jimmy Carter, have said it raised questions about race and the criminal justice system. Wilson and five other males charged in the case are black, as are the two teenage girls involved.

“As far as I’m concerned, this case is a throwback to Southern justice,” said state Sen. Vincent Fort, an Atlanta Democrat.

Wilson, homecoming king of his school, has served more than two years of a mandatory 10-year sentence for aggravated child molestation. He was captured on videotape having consensual oral sex with a 15-year-old girl in 2003 when he was 17.

If the sentence stands, he would also be placed on Georgia’s sex offender registry.

At the time of his crime, Wilson would have faced just one year in prison if he had sexual intercourse with the girl. The “Romeo and Juliet” exception in Georgia law also would have allowed him to avoid the sex offender registry.

Lawmakers last year voted to close that loophole. But the state’s top court said the new law could not be applied retroactively to Wilson, now 21.

Opponents of Wilson’s release said it could open a floodgate for other cases. Georgia prisons currently hold 189 inmates who were sentenced for aggravated child molestation when they were 21 or younger.

Of those, 56 percent were white and 44 percent black, state figures show.

Black community leaders planned a protest outside Attorney General Thurbert Baker’s office late Monday. Baker, who is black, is now pushing to keep Wilson in prison, arguing that his sentence is valid.

In his notice of appeal, Baker argued that Georgia law does not give a judge authority to reduce or modify the sentence imposed by the trial court. He said he would seek an expedited ruling from the Georgia Supreme Court. And he noted that a plea deal is on the table that would release Wilson in a maximum of five years and also remove him from the sex offender registry.

Not good enough, said Wilson’s lawyer, B.J. Bernstein.

“It is really ridiculous when you consider that we had a judge that just said it is a misdemeanor that carries no sex offender registration,” she said.

“It is extremely, extremely disturbing that the attorney general would take this action now.”

Bernstein said her office was seeking bond for Wilson, which would allow him to leave prison while the appeal is pending.

The judge’s ruling Monday threw out Wilson’s 10-year sentence and amended it to misdemeanor aggravated child molestation with a 12-month term, plus credit for time served, and he would not be required to register as a sex offender.

“The fact that Genarlow Wilson has spent two years in prison for what is now classified as a misdemeanor, and without assistance from this court, will spend eight more years in prison, is a grave miscarriage of justice,” wrote Judge Thomas H. Wilson, who is no relation to Genarlow Wilson.

“If this court or any court cannot recognize the injustice of what has occurred here, then our court system has lost sight of the goal our judicial system has always strived to accomplish … justice being served in a fair and equal manner,” the judge wrote.

When the judge’s order arrived Monday morning, Wilson’s lawyers applauded and hugged his mother, Juannessa Bennett, who wiped away tears.

“I just feel like a miracle happened,” Bennett said.

After the notice of appeal she looked stricken.

“It’s heartbreaking,” Bennett said.

Wilson’s prominent supporters included Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, who declared he would boycott Georgia until Wilson was free, and Carter, who wrote a letter in support of Wilson to the state attorney general.

The court battle over Wilson’s fate also drew comparisons to the rape charges leveled against Duke University lacrosse players last year, with critics saying prosecutors in both cases overreached.

Wilson was also charged with rape for being one of several male partygoers at a hotel to have sex with another 17-year-old girl, but was acquitted. The party was captured on a videotape that was played for the jury.

The five other male partygoers took plea deals in the case. One of them has been released from prison and is now in college.

May 22, 2007

Women in Rock, Groupies in Rock

Wow, I was looking through my computer and going through old files.  I came across this long “editorial” or whatever you want to call it. I don’t think I’ve ever posted this, so here it is. Keep in mind that while I still feel the same way, a lot has changed in my life since I wrote this circa 2005.  I’m not in a band right now, I don’t eat ramen/Campbell’s soup (because they usually have MSG), and I’m actually sick of being poor. I’m going back to school in the fall and trying to do the “real job” thing.  Anyway, here it is:

Women in Rock, Groupies in Rock
As a female musician, I’ve always had a majority of males being my closest friends. Sure, I have hundreds of girl friends, but they’re mostly acquaintances. It’s been like that since I was in high school and it confused the hell out of my parents (how many guys are you dating? you’re not dating them? but why do you hang out so much? how can you guys be so close if you’re not “together”?)

Truth is, I can’t understand how most females look at life. I don’t hate. I just can’t RELATE.  I can’t relate to their attitudes towards certain things. This didn’t really come to light for me until I became a part of the Baltimore local music scene.

While I was focusing my entire life on music – turning down good jobs because it wouldn’t fit with the band’s schedule, living off ramen and campbell’s soup, and still driving the same 93 volvo I’ve had since I was sixteen (but loving it because the means justified the ends),  other females who swear their entire life is about music, but who mean that in a totally different way and haven’t put any sacrifice into it, makes me not understand them.

I’ve lived and breathed music my entire life. I’ve always used the saying that I’m better at expressing myself with music than with words since I learned to read music before I learned to read English. I was so young when I started out that I don’t even remember the learning process. While everyone else in school was going to the mall all the time, going to dances, or getting stoned every day, my life was totally different. I was taking piano lessons, theory lessons, group lessons. I missed very few days of school due to illness;  the majority of the school I missed was because I had some competition or judging to attend. I’ve performed more often as a classical musician than I have in any rock  band I’ve been in, and I’ve played probably around 100 shows in rock bands. There were times where it bothered me that I was missing out on the social aspect of growing up. The overwhelming majority of my friends were all people who were in our circle of pianists. And while that was the reason I gave up being in music school, I don’t regret having been in it because I knew I was focusing on something richer. Something that I loved. Something that had meaning.

So when I became a part of the Baltimore local music scene a few years ago, I slowly got more and more annoyed by things.  I got annoyed at girls who claimed that music was their life.  Music wasn’t their life!  Hanging on to the hot band of the moment and trying to date a member of the band was their goal. I’m not talking about girls whose friends are mostly guys in bands and so by default, of course they’re going to end up with guys in bands more often than not. It’s those girls whose “passion” and “focus” in life is to chase down anyone in any band and to get “close” to them for superficial reasons. Those girls who, if a non-musician were to do something to her or have a certain lifestyle, immediately break up with and call a jerk. But if it’s someone who’s a local celebrity, it’s not even an issue. It’s those girls who are obsessed with darker music, so they dress “goth”, but then when that’s not what’s big in the scene, they suddenly and overnight become an emo kid. I could never relate why a girl would focus their life on chasing down musicians when if they put even half that energy into starting their own band, they would probably fill whatever void they’re trying to fill. And then they’d be fighting off their own guys who want them! I can’t relate to these girls at allllll. I can’t understand anyone whose only “passion” in life is who they are going to get with. They don’t have any hobbies, talents, or real interests in anything of substance. It’s fine to want to be with someone. But if that’s all your life is about, there’s something missing. Besides, what do you really have to offer someone if you don’t have a good personality and traits of your own?

I know this is not all females in the music scene here, but the truth is it’s definitely the overwhelming majority. I always hear girls talk about how badly they want to be in a band. But they have no dedication to it. If they actually end up to the point of being in a band, they don’t want to put the work and complete sacrifice that goes into it. They don’t want to be a musician, they want to be recognized. There’s a difference.

It’s like what Oprah Winfrey said once in one of her shows. When she was starting out and was a local news anchor, she told her agent she wanted to be an actress. And her agent said to her No, you don’t want to be an actress. You want to be a celebrity. There’s a difference. Do you really want to live in New York as a waitress making crappy money while constantly going to auditions and getting turned down? And Oprah said she realized her agent was right and that she stopped focusing on that. Because she realized that who she is now is what her dream was all along. That was what she loved focusing her life on at that time.  But back then, there wasn’t much fame in it.

The very few female friends I’ve had, the friendship didn’t last very long. Most of them didn’t end in big fights or anything. It was more of a …. they were interested in someone in my band, or someone our band was closely connected to – like another band we played with often…. and “coincidentally” after hanging out for a while, they’d tell me that they’d been wanting to meet that guy before they’d met me. And once they got what they wanted or they moved on to the next big band in Baltimore, I’d stop hearing from them. And of course hindsight is 20/20 and now it makes me even more cautious of who I befriend.

And again, I know this is not the majority of females. And this is not me dissing music fans in general. I know that there would be no scene if it weren’t for the fans. But it’s those who I don’t really consider real fans. For example, I’m a fan of great visual artwork. I have very little talent in it myself, so when I see someone else’s work it fascinates me and I love it. And certain artworks can help me zone out or help me deal with someone that’s going on in my own life. But I’m not going to befriend all the artists just so I can date them. Does that make any sense?

But one day, I really started to think about it. Because the few other females that I can relate to have all said to me that they’ve had the same issues that I have. So I know it’s not me. And I started to wonder why things were the way the were.

Then I thought about the whole “women in rock” thing. Yes, there are a ton of women in rock music. It’s just that most aren’t mainstream. If you don’t spit out superficial crap like Avril Lavigne or Gwen Stefani (who really aren’t “rock” stars in my book), unfortunately there’s not a big audience for you in America. But, while there’s a ton of amazingly talented women in music, it’s still mostly males in this industry.

It’s definitely a change for me. When I was in music school, there were hardly any males. As a matter of fact, if a new guy came into the school, us girls were almost amazed. Since most of us were friends with each other more than people in school, the 2% of guys there were the only guys we knew.  But then when I got into my rebellious teenage years and was in a few crappy high school bands that don’t last, it was the other way around.

And I realized that a big reason there are more men in ROCK music, is because of people’s attitudes, especially parents. I had a stage mother. VERY involved in every aspect of school and piano. She is an amazingly talented classical musician, but she grew up in an extremely poor, rural part of South Korea, so there weren’t many opportunities for her. Her big dream for me was to become this famous concert pianist and play Carnegie Hall some day. In fact, it was her pushing me too hard that made me want to quit. Sure I wanted it, but she wanted it more than I did.

So you’d think that when I started playing out in bands, then playing solo, then playing back out in a band again – and doing well, that she’d be so happy, right? Happy that I’d once again focused my entire life on creating music. WRONG. She was so angry! Why was I doing music that wasn’t “real” music? Why was I in a field that is so unstable and there is no guarantee of becoming “successful”? Why would I be so stupid to take such a huge risk when before I was headed down the path to going to like a prestigious college for music and then through that I could become a professional concert musician. Why would I give up such a stable and sure shot for something that’s soooo not?

Because success to me isn’t defied in money or label status or anything like that. Success to me is being happy with what you’re doing. Knowing that you’re touching others. And being able to be proud of what your music is and what it’s about. Being able to express yourself. Even though I’d only been in a band that was “only” successful in the mid-atlantic region, to me I was accomplishing everything I had wanted and was happy as hell. We got to perform constantly to different crowds in different areas. We had a loyal fanbase. And truly the greatest thing was hearing personally from others that they could relate to us. Or that I inspired them to start taking piano lessons. Or girls telling me I inspired them to start a rock band of their own.

Sure, money is GREAT. It would certainly solve a lot of my problems. But I’d rather be poor and doing what I love than making a ton of money but hating my life. My friend Dan from a Freudian Slip put it best when he said: “I’d rather be poor and love what I’m doing. Practicing with my band, recording an album, and performing for people. There’s people that work their whole lives to make a ton of money just so they can get that two weeks of vacation. For what? To go to Bermuda and hang out with old people? I’m living a vacation everyday of my life”.

But parents are a lot less anxious about a male going out and living an unstable life and doing “crazy” things than with a girl. Parents are much more protective of their daughters. You can take the same parents who have a son who’s sacrificing his life for whatever dream and while they might not have had that in mind for him, they’re supportive. The same parents have a daughter who tells them she wants a guitar for her birthday. They think it’s some kind of phase and then, like two years later when they finally decide to buy her the guitar because she’s still interested in it, they think that’s the end of it. But then when she starts hanging out with other musicians and jamming out, they get concerned. They want to know more about these people she’s hanging out with. Then if she actually joins a band and spends all her time on that, they start to put their foot down. What about college? What about becoming a doctor? It’s like they’d rather have their teenage daughter out at the mall hanging out with boys, eating Dairy Queen, and trying on the latest M-A-C Makeup products than be a musician. Oh no, that would be the death of her!

I was kicked out of the house when I was a teenager one night out of nowhere, mainly because my mother was sick and tired of the whole band thing. And while I was extremely upset, I felt free. I was like now that I’ve been put in this crappy situation, I’m going to make the best of it. And since I can do whatever I want, I have the freedom to focus on my music. AND I DID. I think in hindsight that getting kicked out was the best thing that ever happened to me. Because it made me realize it was the only thing I had. I was doing the music thing and going to school at the same time, but since that wasn’t a possibility anymore, I just focused everything on just the music. And I wasn’t under my parents strict supervision so if I wasn’t kicked out, I wouldn’t have networked and found the people who became my peers and who became my band mates.

So basically to sum it up, I think that the reason that a lot of females are not in bands, has a lot to do with not getting the support they deserve. Not all girls, of course, some really just don’t care about the music and just care about people’s status. But I think usually you can tell the ones who really know about music, but just don’t know how to play it.

But I also think that’s why, in my opinion, the percentage of women in rock that are so passionate and talented is higher than  the percentage of men.  If you have to fight off everyone getting in your way more than men, if you have to fight not just society’s view of you but your loved ones as well, it means you reaaalllly, truly want it badly. And because you had to work ten times harder than the guy next to you, not only to get to where you are, but to prove that you’re an above average musician and that you deserve to be doing this, you’re usually going to be damn good at it.

May 18, 2007

Earbuds don’t fit!

Am I the only one that has this problem?

No earbuds I have ever tried on even come close to fitting.  Everyone I tell has never heard of this.  Are my ears really that small? It’s just kind of annoying because nowadays, the electronics that come with headphones/earphones now come with earbuds, which are useless to me.

I’d just like to know if I am the only one because yahoo/google searches I’ve done on this have come up with virtually nothing on this. (Just the same person posting over and over on different websites how a certain brand didn’t fit his ears, but other brands did. Remember, no brands I’ve tried so far fit).

May 15, 2007

Baltimore is number 15th city for rude drivers

Speaking of rude and polite drivers, there’s an Associated Press article that just came out today that rates the cities with the rudest drivers. It’s based on a survey, so who really knows the accuracy of the results, but it’s interesting to know.

read more »

April 17, 2007

VA Tech

Original entry and comments: http://cherryteresa.greatestjournal.com/2007/04/17/

My hearts go out to the students, faculty, staff, and the friends of family of the victims of the Virgina Tech tragedy. I know there have been colleges/universities with school shootings in the past, but to me it is more surprising when it happens at a college rather than a high school, middle school, or even elementary school. The reason is that the students generally want to be in college but people in high school and under have no choice. So if they hate it, they’re pretty much stuck unless they can somehow transfer. But of course, the shootings can happen anywhere as people with mental and emotional problems can occur anywhere and of any age, class, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, etc.

I don’t want to sound paranoid and I don’t want to make this tragedy into something else, but I just can’t help but feel the way I do. I am worried that because the killer has been identified as a 23 year-old student originally from South Korea that there will be added racism to Koreans, Korean-Americans and even Asians and Asian-Americans who aren’t Korean. I hope that I am wrong about this. But based on how Koreans are treated as it is and based on how people have reacted to tragedies in the past, this is a real possibility. Some people I know don’t think there is much racism out there for anyone other than African-Americans or Jews. They have no idea. Just a couple weeks ago while I was driving home from work, another driver yelled out the window out to me “You g–k b–ch!” My mother works at the post office and it is not uncommon for customers to say racist things to her to her face. (Telling her to go back to her own country – even though she is a U.S. citizen, asking “can someone White help me?”, are just examples of what people have actually said to her). I constantly hear “jokes” about Asians (and Hispanics) from people who never tell jokes about Black or Jewish people. The n word and k word are bleeped out on non-cable tv while the g word and the ch word usually aren’t. I have had people call me a terrorist, even though I was born here and even if I wasn’t, my family is South Korean. Kim Jong-Il is from North Korea. They are two separate countries for a reason! Even if I were from North Korea, chances are I wouldn’t be a terrorist. Most of the citizens aren’t terrorists and if I had actually went through all the trouble and the huge possibility of death to actually come to America, that would mean that I didn’t like North Korea. (Although it is almost impossible to escape N. Korea to come to America).

There are many other misconceptions and stereotypes of Koreans, but that’s another subject altogether. You take the racism that already exists and look at the way people have reated to tragedies such as Columbine and 9-11, and it makes it almost scary for me to be a Korean-American right now. I was in high school during Columbine. Many people who wore black clothing or kept to themselves were labeled as school shooters. Many schools around the country even suspended students for simply the way they dressed and some schools to this day have ridiculously strict dress codes or mandatory uniforms (these are public schools) because of Columbine. The fact remains that most people who dress “artistically” and listen to a certain type of music don’t go around shooting people. I’d dare to say most are actually anti-gun or at the very least believe in gun control. More “average Joes” have been the killers in school/college shootings but no one points that out. And of course, after 9-11 and to this day, Muslims and basically anyone with dark skin who doesn’t look Black, Hispanic, or Latino are harassed and labelled as terrorists. The overwhelming majority of Muslims do not agree with what happened that day and their actions were actually against the Muslim religion. Saying that the terrorists were Muslim and represent the Muslim religion is like saying David Korresh (or however you spell his name) accurately represented Christians. It just isn’t true. This fact is pointed out constantly by many people. Even George w. Bush points this out. Yet people still have a hatred towards all Muslims, not just the ones who are terrorists. Do these people forget that those “Muslims” actually hate the Muslim-Americans. Do people not realize that Muslim-Americans also died in 9-11? It’s something that’s been brought up since 2001, but is still worth mentioning since many people still continue to be prejudice.

There are very few well-known Koreans in American culture. This is something that has always bothered me. Now that there is someone “famous”, it is for something extremely negative. Unfortunately, many people rely too much on media. I’m afraid that Koreans will now be stereo-typed as loners who can snap at any time. I also hope this won’t make people think that we “shouldn’t allow foreigners” in here anymore. What would piss me off if that happens is those same people would use the tragedy to not allow others in, but not see it as a reason for gun control. I’m not going to say that American culture is necessarily the reason why the tragedy happened. But I do want it to be known it’s not Korean culture either. The shooter lived in this country for 14 years, since he was 8 years old. Private ownership of guns is banned in South Korea and there are no known school shootings in the country. I’m worried these facts will be overlooked. Also, a South Korean student was injured. That will probably also be overlooked.

I really hope that I am wrong about this but history has a tendency to repeat itself. I really hope this horrible tragedy of lives lost and people injured does not turn into another tragedy of harassment and racism.

I know I am not the only one who’s worried as I’ve read reports today that South Korean and Korean-Americans on the Virginia Tech campus have gathered in groups because they are scared about how dangerous it could be for them right now. Imagine how vulnerable and unsafe all the students must feel after a shooter. Now imagine adding to that the fear of what others may do because of your race or nationality.

April 12, 2007

Peeping Tom w/Miho Hatori

Original entry: http://cherryteresa.greatestjournal.com/2007/04/12/

This past Friday I went to a great show at Ram’s Head Live here in Baltimore. Peeping Tom, one of Mike Patton’s bands (it seems like he’s in 300 bands sometimes) was the headliner. Miho Hatori (formerly of Cibo Matto and one of the voices of Noodles from the Gorillaz) was one of the openers.

Ram’s Head is a nice place that books great bands. It’s hard to have a bad seat in the house. I’m only 5’5″, so at a lot of shows that are crowded, it’s harder for me to see. But the way Ram’s Head is set up, it’s a lot easier on the main floor because of how it’s set up. Also, there’s a second floor overlooking the whole thing, which is great. I don’t like how they have bathroom attendants there. I have no problem tipping a waiter or food deliverer, but I’m not paying someone to hand me a paper towel. What also sucks is that it’s near the Power Plant, so you pretty much have to spend the $13 to park in the garage. There is hardly any parking and even if you find a spot far away, it’s on 24/7 meters that you have to fill up every hour or two. So you’d be missing the show to re-fill the meter. That’s if you can even get that spot in the first place. At least the garage is right next to Ram’s Head with the elevator taking you there. That’s convenient, especially if you’re going there on a cold night.

Miho Hatori’s songs sounded similar to Cibo Matto but less funky. It was a mellower version. I do like Cibo Matto better, but I still enjoyed her set and was excited to catch her. It was the first of only four dates that she’s playing with Peeping Tom on this tour and so I feel lucky. Back when Cibo Matto was around, the only one or two times they came to Baltimore after I moved here was either on a school night or an 18+ place and I was still in high school at the time, so I couldn’t go. Back then, less clubs were all ages. Anyway, the crowd was surprisingly enthusiastic, maybe even too enthusiastic. It was funny. During her first song, she and her band had to start over because the sound in the monitors was all messed up. I can relate. That sucks when that happens. When she said she had to start the song over, the audience cheered! But that’s better than someone audiences, who boo because they don’t realize if you can’t hear yourself or the other instruments, it’s pretty difficult to perform well. Later in the set, she walked over toward her guitar to play some songs with guitar in it, and everyone cheered loudly just for that. I don’t know if it was mocking or sincere because later people complained about her. After she played and before Peeping Tom, I walked around to socialize with people and said did pretty much what people did when I saw Mr. Bungle (one of Mike Patton’s bands) back in 2000. Mr. Bungle was an opener and the majority of the crowd hated them. Not just disliked, but hated them. Then, after they were done and they heard “that’s the singer from Faith No More”, they suddenly changed their minds and said how great thet set was. People did that with Miho Hatori. “She does the ‘get cool shoe shine song’ in the Gorillaz? Oh my g-d, I like her now”. Losers.

Then came Peeping Tom. My friends and I were wondering how Patton would pull this off live. The album has a lot of guest stars on it (some of whom, such as Nora Jones and Kool Keith, he has yet to meet face-to-face). The only one of those guest stars performing live with him was Dan the Automator. How was he going to perform without Rahzel? Well, he and his band did a great job! There was a total of eight members on the stage. Three of them were in a band the Dub Trio. There was an awesome female beatboxer, one of the best I’ve heard. The keyboardist had at least three keyboards if I remember correctly. Great energy and each of the member’s performances were spot on. The songs sound like a hip-hoppish and somewhat poppish version of Mr. Bungle. Patton says that this is record is his pop album. Not necessarily pop that’s on the radio, but his version of it. Mike Patton (along with Kathleen Hanna) is one of the few people that can really pull of being in bands of different genres. The music still “sounds like Matt Patton” but doesn’t sound the same as each other. It’s original and fresh and it’s not like “Oh g-d, not another Patton project”. I’m not one of these obsessive Matt Patton fans though like some of the weirdos who were at the show. But I like and respect the guy. Wish there were more signed artists like him in rock right now. Rock is in such a weird state right now, but that’s a whole other topic.

Patton also wore a stocking cap on his head. He was able to pull that off with his personality. 😉

December 1, 2004

Friend of mine dies in war

http://cherryteresa.greatestjournal.com/2004/12/01/

ANOTHER friend of mine is dead. A good friend of mine from when I was in middle school died fighting this stupid war. We used to chill like everyday at at his house back when I lived in Mt. Washington. And now he’s gone.

I miss you David Branning and I’m sorry that you had to be a part of this unnecessary war. And that you lost your LIFE doing so. We love you.

http://www.pigstye.net/iraq/article.php/20041118081029177